<kbd id="rlcwgm35"></kbd><address id="qlbu2sxm"><style id="w1bj54lf"></style></address><button id="ujwbtd8y"></button>

          sunbet logo The words "sunbet".
          Close icon Two crossed lines that form an 'X'. It indicates a way to close an interaction, or dismiss a notification.

          Colombian traffickers are squeezing more cocaine out of fewer coca plants

          Colombia cocaine sinaloa Colombia cocaine sinaloa
          Colombian police officials examine confiscated packs of cocaine at the police base in Necoclii, February 24, 2015.
          REUTERS/ John Vizcaino
          • The total area of coca under cultivation in Colombia dropped in 2019, according to the UN, but the of amount cocaine, in which coca is the base ingredient, produced rose over the same period.
          • The trend shows that criminals can get more cocaine from fewer crops and illustrates that eradication alone is not enough.
          • Visit sunbet's homepage for more stories.

          A drop of 15,000 hectares of coca crops in Colombia made no difference in reducing cocaine production in 2019 — instead it increased compared with the previous year.

          Coca crops covered 154,000 hectares in 2019, a drop from the 169,000 hectares recorded in 2018, according to the latest report by the Illicit Cultivations Monitoring System (Sistema Integrado de Monitoreo de Cultivos Ilícitos — SIMCI) of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).

          The 9% drop was the largest reduction in coca crops in six years, according to the report.

          When presenting the report, UNODC representative Pierre Lapaque called the figures "good news" for Colombia, praising the efforts of the government and farmers who abandoned coca crops for helping break a growth trend that began in 2014.

          Colombia cocaine coca production farmer
          A worker walks over crushed coca leaves, mixed with chemicals, as part of the process to make coca paste, on a small farm in Guayabero, Guaviare province, Colombia.
          REUTERS/John Vizcaino

          Yet despite the decrease in coca, production of cocaine increased 1.5%, to 1,136 metric tons in 2019.

          Meanwhile, the UNODC's drop in coca crops is at odds with figures published in March by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), which indicated an increase of 4,000 hectares of coca last year. The ONDCP reported 212,000 hectares of coca crops in Colombia in 2019, a slight jump from the 208,000 in 2018. The White House also reported an increase in cocaine production from 879 metric tons to 951 metric tons.

          Strangely, the White House tallied 58,000 more hectares of coca crops than the UNODC but recorded 185 fewer metric tons of cocaine.

          500 Internal Server Error

          Internal Server Error

          The server encountered an internal error and was unable to complete your request. Either the server is overloaded or there is an error in the application.

          InSight Crime analysis

          Colombia coca cocaine crops eradication war on drugs
          A Colombian antidrug policeman escorts workers during an eradication operation at a coca-leaf plantation near San Miguel, southern Putumayo province, August 15 2012.
          REUTERS/Fredy Builes

          The increase in cocaine production despite a reduction in coca cultivation underscores that merely eradicating crops cannot solve Colombia's cocaine problem.

          Since the beginning of President Iván Duque's administration, Colombia has made reducing coca cultivation and cocaine production top priorities. That remains true, though US President Donald Trump has said Duque "has done nothing" to reduce the flow of cocaine to the United States.

          Duque recently touted drops in coca crops in several departments. For example, Caquetá has recorded a decrease of 50%, Antioquia 30%, Nariño 12%, and Bolívar 7.5%.

          But certain zones, which are conducive to not only growing coca crops, but also producing and smuggling cocaine, are seeing increases in coca. These include Valle del Cauca and Norte de Santander departments, which, according the UNODC report, saw increases in land used to cultivate coca by 82% and 24%, respectively.

          Colombia Tumaco coca cocaine eradication
          Colombian security forces with seized cocaine seized at a military base in Tumaco, March 16, 2013.
          REUTERS/John Vizcaino

          Valle del Cauca, in Colombia's southwest, is strategically placed to grow coca and produce cocaine along remote banks of the Naya river. The drugs are then smuggled to the Pacific coast. Norte de Santander's location provides smuggling routes to neighboring Venezuela, which serves as a launchpad for cocaine shipments to Central America and the Caribbean.

          Lapaque, the UNODC representative, acknowledged that organized crime groups have increasingly been able to obtain more cocaine from fewer crops.

          "They use better chemicals, so the transformation of the coca leaf has become more professional, and they have achieved a better quality," he told El Tiempo.

          Enormous laboratories requiring infrastructure and massive manpower are the past. Strategic points and technical ability are what matters now.

          500 Internal Server Error

          Internal Server Error

          The server encountered an internal error and was unable to complete your request. Either the server is overloaded or there is an error in the application.

          Read the original article on InSight Crime. Copyright 2020. Follow InSight Crime on Twitter.

          SEE ALSO: Why a measly 5-ton cocaine bust is a sign of a much bigger problem in Costa Rica

          More: InSight Crime News Contributor Colombia coca
          Chevron icon It indicates an expandable section or menu, or sometimes previous / next navigation options.

              <kbd id="rszxxfgb"></kbd><address id="bqeaq7im"><style id="hi8w399v"></style></address><button id="mpp2ttlf"></button>