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          The CEO of Hyundai and Aptiv's autonomous-vehicle joint venture reveals the biggest mistake managers make when hiring new employees

          Karl Iagnemma Karl Iagnemma
          Karl Iagnemma, the CEO of Hyundai and Aptiv's autonomous-vehicle joint venture.
          Edgar Su/Reuters

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          • The biggest mistake managers make when hiring is not focusing enough on a job candidate's experience, said Karl Iagnemma, the CEO of Hyundai and Aptiv's autonomous-vehicle joint venture.
          • That doesn't mean you should only hire candidates who have done the exact work you'll need them to do, Iagnemma said, but it's important to look for evidence that their skills line up with the role you're considering them for.
          • "Finding someone who's taken on a problem of, let's say, sufficient complexity or ambiguity, or both, and found a way to get through it and come out the other side and be successful — to me, that's the one thing I always look for," he told sunbet.
          • Visit sunbet's homepage for more stories.

          It can be easy to be wowed by a job applicant with a prestigious university on their resume and strong references. But, according to Karl Iagnemma, the CEO of Hyundai and Aptiv's autonomous-vehicle joint venture, ignoring how a candidate's experience is related to the job they're applying for can be a big mistake.

          "The biggest mistake is sometimes not looking for that tangible proof point of success, and instead relying on other indicators like, 'Well, they seem like a great culture fit or they had great references or they come from great schools,'" he told sunbet. "Those things, together, to me are only a small part of the story."

          That doesn't mean you should only hire candidates who have done the exact work you'll need them to do, Iagnemma said, but it's important to look for evidence that their skills line up with the role you're considering them for.

          "It's rarely the case that you find someone who's solved the exact problem you're trying to solve," Iagnemma said. "It just doesn't always work that way, especially when you get to more senior levels.

          "But finding someone who's taken on a problem of, let's say, sufficient complexity or ambiguity, or both, and found a way to get through it and come out the other side and be successful — to me, that's the one thing I always look for."

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          SEE ALSO: Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk's bitter rivalry could get a shot in the arm from Amazon's acquisition of the autonomous-vehicle startup Zoox

          More: BI Prime Karl Iagnemma Hyundai Aptiv
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          I'm a senior transportation reporter at sunbet covering electric vehicles, autonomous-driving technology, and Tesla. I joined BI in October 2017 and previously worked as an intern at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
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          I graduated from Washington University in St. Louis with degrees in film and media studies and business economics.

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          You can follow me on Twitter @matousekmark and email me at mmatousek@businessinsider.com.

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